Hoagland Pharmacy

Serving Whatcom, Skagit, Island & Snohomish Counties

What's Happening

Archive for September 2009

FluMist Nasal Spray Is Here

Our shipment of FluMist nasal spray has arrived. If you’re no friend of needles, you might opt to give this a try. Doses are limited so call ahead to reserve yours! Never heard of it? Me either. Check out the CDC website for more information.

Tags: ,
posted by:

Seasonal and H1N1 Flu Vaccines: What You Need to Know

  • Comments Off on Seasonal and H1N1 Flu Vaccines: What You Need to Know

2009-2010 Seasonal Influenza Vaccine
The 2009 -2010 flu season is on the horizon (or for some, it’s already here). Most of our flu vaccines are in so if you want to get a jump start on the season here’s what you need to know:

  • We currently have flu shots available for ages 3 years and up
  • Pediatric vaccines (age 6 months – 36 months) will be available the first full week of October
  • We have preservative-free vaccines upon request
  • We can bill Medicare, Group Health, and Medicaid (age 19 and up)
  • Cost is $25
  • We are trying to get the Flumist “nasal spray” and will let you know when we do
  • Walk-in (no appointment) Monday – Friday 9:00 to 5:00 Saturday 9:00 to 4:00

Groups who are recommended to get seasonal flu shots include:

  • Children at 6 months – 18 years
  • Pregnant Women
  • People 50 or over
  • People with chronic medical conditions
  • People who live in nursing homes or other long term facilities
  • People who live with or take care of those at high risk

Regarding H1N1
We have preregistered with the State to provide the “Swine flu” or novel H1N1. It is not quite ready yet, and we really don’t have much information about it. The CDC thinks it will be available sometime this fall but are still waiting on manufacturing time and clinical trials. The seasonal flu vaccine is not expected to protect against the 2009 H1N1 flu. More questions and answers can be found on the CDC Questions and Answers page.

Groups who are recommended to receive the 2009 H1N1 Influenza vaccine include:

  • Pregnant women because they are at higher risk of complications and can potentially provide protection to infants who cannot be vaccinated;
  • Household contacts and caregivers for children younger than 6 months of age because younger infants are at higher risk of influenza-related complications and cannot be vaccinated. Vaccination of those in close contact with infants younger than 6 months old might help protect infants by “cocooning” them from the virus;
  • Healthcare and emergency medical services personnel because infections among healthcare workers have been reported and this can be a potential source of infection for vulnerable patients. Also, increased absenteeism in this population could reduce healthcare system capacity;
  • All people from 6 months through 24 years of age
    • Children from 6 months through 18 years of age because cases of 2009 H1N1 influenza have been seen in children who are in close contact with each other in school and day care settings, which increases the likelihood of disease spread, and
    • Young adults 19 through 24 years of age because many cases of 2009 H1N1 influenza have been seen in these healthy young adults and they often live, work, and study in close proximity, and they are a frequently mobile population; and,
  • Persons aged 25 through 64 years who have health conditions associated with higher risk of medical complications from influenza.

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has an amazingly informative and comprehesive site regarding both the seasonal flu and the H1N1 flu. We encourage you to check out their site for answers to your questions as it really is a wealth of helpful information and will be the first to post when the H1N1 vaccine is ready.

Tags: , , ,
posted by:

Categories